Showing all posts tagged: 'command line'

A 4-post collection

Scaffolding DbContext and Models with EntityFramework Core 2.0 and the CLI

EF Core 2.0 has been out for a few weeks now. If you're looking at an ORM for your .NET application then EF Core should be at the top of the list of possible options. I say at the top and not the only one because depending on the project requirements, some features may be missing. For example, EF Core cut ties with .edmx so if you want to stick with the designer feature you will need to use EF6. There are other limitations so make sure you have a look at this post for API changes in 2. …[read more]


Exploring the Azure CLI 2.0 with Windows Subsystem for Linux

The new Azure CLI 2.0 was released a few weeks ago so it was time for me to upgrade and take it for a spin. I blogged a while ago on how to install the "old" CLI which was based on Node.js but this is a whole new beast so let's get started. This is a true 2.0 in so may ways! Installing I decided to install it on my WSL because I can take advantage of my very limited Linux skills and showcase to customers the capabilities of W10 and Linux in one box. Unlike its …[read more]


ASP.NET Core from the command line

ASP.NET Core (formerly known as ASP.NET 5 or vNext) runs on top of the new DotNet Core and is in love with the command line. Although Visual Studio 2015 is still an excellent IDE and Visual Studio Code an amazing code editor, the new iteration of ASP.NET is equally powerful with the command line. ASP.NET Core 1.0 hit RTM on June 27th, however the tooling around it is still in Preview. Things are still changing, mainly because there's still work to be done around the csproj/project.json migration and dotnet native. How to install …[read more]


Generate ASCII folder structures on Windows with Tree

I was reading through Adron Hall's post yesterday about generating ASCII trees on Linux and Mac OSx. This is a handy feature if you want to include a project/folder structure to your documentation and don't wish to copy paste screenshots. What is an ASCII tree you may ask? There you go: Say hello to the tree command. This MS-DOS command has been around since Windows XP (YES really) but it's not well advertised. I only found out today and that's 14 years late! This is how to use it: Open your favorite command line editor (I jump between Powershell …[read more]