Showing all posts tagged: 'cross-platform'

A 4-post collection

Combining data from multiple sources in Azure Search

Azure Search is a great service that allows developers to add search functionality in their applications. I blogged about how to index and query data from SQL Server using Azure Search before. Today, I want to talk about a more advanced scenario and one that could be more common than you think. By default, every Search index is designed to pull data from one source. The source can be a SQL Database, a blob storage or Azure Table Storage. However, there are valid scenarios where you may want to combined data from multiple sources in the same search index. There …[read more]


Running Azure Functions anywhere with the power of containers

I work with Azure Functions a lot. I also work a lot with Docker, Windows Containers, and microservices in general. For some time I have been talking about these subjects either to customers or at conferences trying to explain how they can be used to fulfill different tasks and meet different project requirements. Azure Functions are the swiss army knife of developers and IT/Ops teams because they can solve so many problems with minimal code, maintenance overhead and infrastructure abstractions around scalability and reliability. Up until now, if someone needed to create a run an Azure Function there were …[read more]


Exploring the Azure CLI 2.0 with Windows Subsystem for Linux

The new Azure CLI 2.0 was released a few weeks ago so it was time for me to upgrade and take it for a spin. I blogged a while ago on how to install the "old" CLI which was based on Node.js but this is a whole new beast so let's get started. This is a true 2.0 in so may ways! Installing I decided to install it on my WSL because I can take advantage of my very limited Linux skills and showcase to customers the capabilities of W10 and Linux in one box. Unlike its …[read more]


Install and run the Azure CLI on the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSFL)

I've blogged before about the tremendous work that the Windows team has done to bring a truly integrated Linux subsystem on Windows 10. That's right, you can use the native Linux (user and kernel modes) inside Windows without the need of a VM, Container or any other emulator. This has opened up so many possibilities and brings a very powerful tool to Windows. Using native Bash is a dream come true for many people and even me, whose use of it is limited to 0.05% of its true capabilities!!! Do I care? No. Do I use Bash? Whenever and …[read more]