Showing all posts tagged: 'REST Api'

A 4-post collection

The new Azure Powershell Resource Manager - 1.0 Preview

The new Azure PowerShell preview module is out. I use PowerShell on Azure to automate many tasks and it's something that we use in the team quite frequently. Yes, you can use the Azure Portal (website) to accomplish the same tasks but I like using PowerShell for a few reasons: Create repeatable and consistent tasks Share the files and knowledge that comes with it Automate all the things! This preview release is the first major version taking it to 1.0. Unfortunately, it brings some breaking changes with it. For this reason, it's imperative that you read the documentation before …[read more]

ASP.NET MVC WebAPI - Optional parameters

ASP.NET WebAPI is a powerful tool for creating APIs quickly and efficiently in .NET. In fact, it takes minimal effort to expose your data through WebAPI though this is both a curse and a blessing. Blessing because it's so easy, curse because you need to be very careful of what you expose. You need to ensure that you're not exposing unwanted information and only provide authenticated access when necessary. Securing WebAPI is a big subject so I'll leave that for another post. Today, I'll show you how to create WebAPI controller methods that take optional parameters. 1. Using default …[read more]

Create passwords and check password strength using a public Open Source API

The PasswordUtility API is one of the pet projects I've been working on for a while. Today I'm delighted to announce that the project goes to public availability. The solution hosted in Azure (where else?) and consists of 2 parts: A public facing website where you can test the API features A public API to use in your applications. The project is fully Open Source and it's driven by the PasswordUtility library hosted on GitHub and readily available to download from NuGet. If you're interested in knowing how the library works, I've put together a nice write up on GitHub. …[read more]

Testing locally with Fiddler

Fiddler is awesome when it comes debugging HTTP on your local machine. It can intercept HTTP requests and responses and has a very powerful IDE that adds a lot of extra advanced features that can help you monitor and troubleshoot your HTTP calls. However, one thing that is tricky with Fiddler is the fact that for Fiddler to intercept any calls made to a locally running/installed API, you need to use a custom URL => http://ipv4.fiddler/<yourAPIEndpoint> If you have unit tests or you're trying to debug your code, you have to constantly change your endpoint …[read more]