Showing all posts tagged: 'VS Code'

A 7-post collection

TypeScript 2.0 RC with Visual Studio Code

You know how much I love new, shiny things? For some odd reason, I'm compelled to try the latest and 'greatest' as soon as I know it's available. This, oftentimes, has inadvertent side effects such as breaking my machine and causing me undue stress. I also choose to do these upgrades/updates close to upcoming talking engagements. In summary, I'm a gluten for self-inflicted punishment. On the other side, I suffer so you don't have to :) Today, I decide to test the latest version of TypeScript 2.0 RC which was released only 2 days ago. I also chose to …[read more]

Working with TypeScript in Visual Studio Code - a pair made for each other

TypeScript is a new(ish), open source language that is a superset of JavaScript. TypeScript was designed to bring object-oriented features along with ES6 support. Any valid JavaScript is TypeScript and all TypeScript code compiles to nice, clean JavaScript. With ES6 (EcmaScript2015) officially ratified, TypeScript continues to offer great forward-compatibility with newly added features all the time and therefore, it remains a great language for developing JavaScript. This fantastic language now has a great companion: Visual Studio(VS) Code. VS Code is the new lightweight code editor from Microsoft and was in fact built with TypeScript! Consequently, it's only natural …[read more]

Working with Azure ARM Templates in Visual Studio Code

These days I spend a lot of time working with Azure. I also make a conscious effort to use all the tools available when managing my Azure resources. This helps me get a better understanding of the platform and allows me to move freely between devices. So what are these tools? Let's break it down: Visual Studio Azure CLI The portal PowerShell Add Azure Resource Management (ARM) templates on top of these and you can see how provisioning and managing resources is now a much better experience. In addition, ARM templates allow us to take full advantage of CI/CD …[read more]

Fix OmniSharp error 'No default runtime found' in Visual Studio Code on Windows

I wanted to mess around with .NET Core on my machine and create a simple application. I'm not talking about ASP.NET Core 1.0 but .NET Core 1.0. And yes, they are different! Very different. The .NET Core applications rely on the dotnet toolchain whereas ASP.NET Core ones rely on the dnx, dnvm, dnu toolchain. Can it get any more confusing? Of course it can, just wait until you have to start targeting frameworks in your libraries. It's awesome(ly) confusing and I hope things are streamlined before we hit RTM. But until then, I want to …[read more]

Create Electron applications with Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code (VSCode) is by far my favourite editor. I've got nothing against Sublime or Atom, but the first one is not free and the second one tends to get a bit slow. I use all 3, in case you think of accusing me of favouritism, but my Go-To editor is VSCode. One of its biggest strengths is obviously the debugging experience. This week I decided to start rewriting my password application (PasswordDefence) with Electron. This will mean that once finalized, I will have a mobile and desktop presence and it also gives me a good opportunity to play …[read more]

Setting up a Gulp task with Visual Studio Code

As a web developer, certain tools have become indispensable. I can't even imagine having to do any front-end work without npm, Grunt or Gulp. In fact, these tools are so great that the upcoming release of ASP.NET has thrown away proprietory package and task managers in favour of the widely adopted and established tools used by the community. And these tools are now first class citizens both in Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code. Classic .NET developers and avid Visual Studio users will have a lot of catching up to do. But we are here to help! Today, I …[read more]